Review activities | Ideas from Twitter

Twitter activities.png

Ever since Kamila tweeted about this activity, I’ve been wanting to collect activity ideas people share on Twitter because I find that liking or a retweeting stuff like this doesn’t always translate to revisiting or using it subsequently. What I particularly love about these activities is their simplicity – the picture says it all!


And then thanks to the utterly prolific Pete Sanderson (@LessonToolbox), I found a lot of review activities shared by teachers of other subjects such as history, science and Spanish. I can easily see myself adapting some of these ideas for both my learners as well as for teacher training workshops. There are literally hundreds of tweets with activity ideas but I’ve selected a few that I thought were interesting. Don’t miss place mats for CPD – fair warning – you’ll have to scroll down quite a bit until you get to it.

This one’s not just a plain vanilla review activity, it’s also a metacognitive exercise where students have to decide what they need to focus on.


This twist on Scrabble could lend itself to vocabulary, receptive skills tasks and for reviewing content knowledge such as information about teaching approaches.

Here’s another way of presenting it:

Along with the template:

Here’s a more intensive review activity inspired by Scrabble:


I love this blob activity. It would work well for speaking but it might also be an interesting reflection exercise.

This one seems similar to tasks I’ve seen in a lot of writing worksheets but the old newspaper cutout’s given me some ideas.


Speak like a historian – this is brilliant – Speak like a global consultant, speak like a teacher, speak like a researcher, speak like someone at B2?! I’m going to be using this one a lot!

Another version of speak like a historian:

This has obviously been very popular with history teachers – here’s another:


A more intensive activity – the instructions are given at the top of the worksheet.


I think the creators of this activity intended summary pyramids to be worksheet-based but I am going to be using Cusinenaire rods to bring this to life.


Question balloons might require a lot of prep but it could also be a lot of fun.


Place mats for prompting CPD-related reflection for teachers – this one’s just amazeballs! I can’t wait to try it out.


A simple graphic organiser activity – I’m not completely sure if the learner is also required to create some kind of connection between the different pieces of information s/he writes into the squares.


This school’s Twitter account is the friggin motherload of activities. I am obsessed with verb bugs – can’t wait to try it out with English collocations.

This mingling activity seems more familiar – I like the idea of ‘stealing’ a card and I think my learners will too.

This one’s a great way of encouraging learners to take more ownership for what happens in the classroom as well as their own learning.

I haven’t done linking hexagons in ages – I’m going to try to sneak it in for some vocabulary work.

I don’t know where I’d be able to use this but it looks really neat.


🙂 Head in a hole!


Finally, a fun emoji review:

I set out to catalogue just a few but I’ve ended up with quite a lot and I’ve only been through tweets from a few accounts since the start of this year. I think I’m going to do this as a regular exercise. I’ve got a lot more practical ideas from these tweets than I have from many ELT activity books.

Image attribution: Photo by freestocks.org on Unsplash

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