My sophomore year as a teacher trainer | Reflections

Folks in my PLN have been asking me why I don’t seem to write anything about the teacher training projects I work on and whether it’s all top secret. For isn’t teacher training a potentially profound experience to reflect on?

Adi Rajan teacher trainer.jpg

I concur and I do reflect in a private learning journal. The briefing I’ve got is that I can discuss the work I do on these projects ‘in general’ but will need to avoid being ‘specific’ about anything, which sort of makes it challenging to craft anything insightful for public consumption.

The good news is that one of the projects I’m currently contributing to has a relatively public profile with lots of buzz on social media, so I thought I would share some ‘general’ information 😉

The projects are run by British Council India in partnership with Indian state governments and other institutional bodies. The focus is on improving teaching standards, learner experiences, and of course outcomes. The projects reach out to hundreds of thousands of teachers in state-run schools, and have an impact on the lives of millions of school going children from lower-income and rural families.

One of the projects I’m currently working on is called TEJAS. It’s a three year initiative in 9 districts of Maharashtra, India’s most industrialized state.  The project focuses on developing Teacher Activity Groups (TAGs) which are semi-formal, localised teacher meetings supported by coordinators (who I trained). The TAGs will ultimately run autonomously, facilitated by the teachers themselves who’ll select from a range of curated resources to explore in each meeting.

You can read more about this project at

You can have a look at the Storify feed for our first round of training in Nashik, Nagpur and Aurangabad:

You can follow the project and its activities on Twitter

Here’s a video that introduces the concept of TAGs to its target audience.

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