These boots were made for presentin’ | A presentation activity

Inner shoes.png

I designed this creative visualisation activity on a project where it was ultimately not used and I’ve got permission to share it here. It could potentially be included in a workshop on presentation skills or as a stand-alone activity run in a team huddle or meeting.

Have you ever used creative visualisation? What sort of visual imagery do you incorporate?


Overview

Creative visualisation may help presenters manage their nerves through calming visual imagery, a technique borrowed from acting. This particular activity also uses shoes as metaphors for qualities associated with confident presenters. The technique can be used to calm nerves before a presentation. It puts presenters in a positive mind frame by focusing the inner voice on something productive instead of negative self-talk.

The handout offers a range of visualisation prompts because different people have different sources of anxiety and they’ll need to find a visualisation that works for them. Each visualisation begins with putting on a pair of ‘inner’ shoes and ends with a destination or goal that represents success.

Objective

  • Use creative visualisation as a way of managing nerves just before a presentation.

Procedure

  • Pair off participants and ask them to look at the shoes in the handout and suggest how wearing these different types of shoes might make them feel.
  • Point out to participants that wearing ‘inner’ shoes could potentially boost their confidence in a presentation.
  • Get them to discuss the sorts of situations they would want to wear these inner shoes in. For example, you are nervous and you feel really cold and stiff at the start of a presentation at an industry meet. Imagining yourself in football cleats might help you kick your presentation off with some energy. Some possible responses are given below.
  • Ask participants to recall a presentation where they experienced some nervousness. Get them to close their eyes and talk them through the following creating visualisation:

Your presentation starts in 5 minutes. Your mind is racing and you can’t focus because you are thinking about a million things. You reach out grab on a pair of your inner flip-flops and put them on. Feel the tension melt away from your body. Relax your shoulders. Take deep breaths. When you feel your breathing starting to slow, let your hands hang loose by your side. You’re walking on a soft sandy beach. Feel the sand between your toes. You hear waves in the distance. You look up and see a calm blue sea stretching out in front of you. As the tide goes out, you walk towards the rising sun on the horizon.

  • Have participants work in pairs to look through the other visualisation prompts in the toolkit and choose one that they find useful. Participants then practise the creative visualisation prompt with their partners. Encourage them to add details that make the visualisation feel more real.

Debrief

  • Use the following questions to debrief the activity:
    • Why is this kind of visualisation useful when you’re nervous?
    • Our inner voices sometimes trigger nervousness through negative self-talk. How does the visualisation of ‘inner’ shoes help with this?
    • Why does each visualisation end with a destination or a goal?

Suggested responses 

  1. Flip-flops: relaxed, casual, calm
  2. Sneakers: comfortable, easy-going
  3. Rain boots/wellingtons: persistent, determined
  4. Cowboy boots: self-assured, poised, strong
  5. Football/soccer cleats: dynamic, active, energetic
  6. Hiking boots: adventurous, daring

Download the handout from the following link ⬇️

Image attribution: Photo by Nathan Dumlao on Unsplash

Illustrations from images | Shapes in Adobe Capture

Adobe capture

Here’s a quick post about an app I’ve just started exploring. Adobe Capture is a free smartphone app with in-app camera that lets you do a lot of really interesting graphic design edits. I’ve been looking at the ‘shapes’ function which converts images into pen and ink-type illustrations. Here are some examples of things I took pictures of.

Shape 4

Shape 1

Shape 2 (1)

What’s interesting is that it does a pretty good job with fairly complex objects with lots of details and contours like this statue.

The app is fairly intuitive but here are the steps I followed to convert some keys on my kitchen counter. You can get rid of the background and any other distractions (you can see my shadow in the first couple of images) using a combination of the contrast slider and the wand. Any bits and bobs that are left can be erased. A smoothing function will make things look regular – in this case it actually gets rid of some nice details so you’ll need to play around to get the best results.

The final image gets saved as an SVG file in your own Adobe library but you can export it as an SVG or PNG file. Although I haven’t quite figured out how – you can also export assets as vectors which could be really useful.

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These illustrations would look quite nice in print materials and create a cohesive visual look across say a participant guide, addressing issues associated with printing colour images in black and white. They could also work well in online layouts to create a minimalist course look.

Adobe Capture is available for iOS and Android phones.

Pseudo-design titles | A UX activity

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This quick activity uses Pseudo-design titles, a website that lampoons the often florid and bombastic job titles people have in the UX/design industry. It could be used with learners  who are heading into a design/technology focused degree or  more generally with business learners.


  • Ask learners to work in pairs to discuss the designations or job titles they would like to have when they start working.
  • Get learners to access designtitles.com on their phones. The site randomly generates job titles so everyone’s likely to get a different title.
  • Learners work in groups to discuss what these job titles imply and how this might be different from the sort of work they might actually do. For example, ‘an analyst of archetypal visuals’ sounds like a role that involves innovative work but might in fact be someone who selects stock visuals from an existing image bank.  A ‘multidisciplinary convincer of futuristic predictions’ could be a sales and marketing person.
  • Lead the learners in a discussion about why people try to bolster their ‘value proposition’ with exotic job titles and the impact of this. Ask learners to identify other ways of enhancing their value to prospective employees or within a job.

I have to confess that not all of the titles make sense but some of them are hilarious. Which one of these would you want to have for yourself? Have you come across similar job titles in your professional context?

  • Chief Assassin of Colours
  • Neural Arranger of Visualization
  • Whiteboarder of Quintessential States and Post-Human Practices
  • Arbitrator of Design
  • Cognitive Designer of Theoretical Ideas
  • Stimulist for Accessibility
  • Explorer for Heuristic Best Practices
  • User State Mentor

The image in this post is sourced from https://designtitles.com/ and I found out about the site from a tweet by Ajay Pangarkar (@bizlearningdude).

 

Chicken Vada-Pav | A translanguaging task

Translanguaging Marathi.png

Here’s another translanguaging task based on a translingual text from a poster advertising the ubiquitous vada-pav or Bombay burger. Vada-pavs generally have a fried potato filling but this one unusually has chicken. The text says “Garam-Spicy Chicken Vada-Pav” in the Devanagari script and then repeats the words Chicken Vada-Pav in the Roman script. The Indian words are presumably in Marathi but are intelligible to Hindi speakers.

For more information on translanguaging, read the first post in this series.


View this post on Instagram

We need more of these and Goan sausage pav.

A post shared by Mumbai Paused (@mumbaipaused) on

Objectives

  • Review and recycle adjectives related to food
  • Raise awareness of the phonemic variation between /v/, /w/ and /ʋ/
  • Maximise communicative potential through translanguaging.

Materials 

  • Display the Instagram post or get learners to access it on their own devices.

Warm-up

  • Ask learners to talk about their favourite street food with their partners.
  • Display the Instagram post and ask learners to discuss if there’s anything unusual about this street food. Would they want to try it?

Translanguaging task

  • Get learners to identify all the English words (spicy and chicken).
  • Ask them to translate the other words into English so the text becomes wholly English (Elicit “Hot and spicy chicken burger/sandwich”).
  • Ask them to discuss the following questions in their home language and/or English:
  1. In the original Marathi text, there’s no ‘and’ between the adjectives, why did we add ‘and’ in English?
  2. Why didn’t we do a literal translation of vada-pav (fritter-bread/roll)? Why is burger/sandwich a better way of describing the dish in English?
  • Get learners to work with गरम-Spicy and come up with alternatives to ‘spicy’ for different translingual combinations.
  • Have them now convert these into wholly English combinations inserting an ‘and’ between the adjectives (hot and delicious, hot and sour etc..
  • Now focus on ‘chicken’ and ask learners to brainstorm other adjectives that could modify vada-pav/burger (vegetable, potato, lentil etc.).
  • Lastly, get them to notice the spelling of pav (paw) in the Roman script at the bottom of the poster. Ask them to consider how the word is spelled phonetically in Marathi and how best to write this in English (vada or wada | pav, paw or pao)? There may be some variations here in how they say this in their home language. It might also be useful to point out the mouth positioning for /v/, /w/ and the Marathi phoneme /ʋ/ in vada-pav vs. wada-pao. Interestingly, the word ‘pav’ has come to Marathi from the Portuguese ‘pão’ via Konkani.

Extension task 

  • Get learners to work in groups to make posters advertising their own favourite street food. They can use a combination of scripts and languages.

 

I tried this activity with some teachers recently. It was fairly quick and they had a lot of fun with it.

Image attribution: 

  1. The vada pav image is sourced from Garrett Ziegler | Flickr | CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
  2. The Instagram image was posted by @mumbaipaused on Oct 2, 2018: https://www.instagram.com/p/BobrJlNFTZ2/?

Life after CELTA | An interview with Resham George

Resham George.png

I remember getting interviewed for a language school in India, where the interviewer first asked me what the CELTA was, and then promptly asked me why I bothered getting it.

Here’s the next interview from my Life after CELTA series. I started this blog series to capture the range of career options that are available to CELTA-qualified teachers in India and the challenges they face in a job market where Cert-TESOL courses aren’t seen as having much value from an employer perspective.

Resham did the CELTA in Bombay a little over a year ago. I wanted to catch up with her because she’d been a drama teacher for a couple of years and I thought it would be interesting to see what sort of expectations she had of the course, whether these needs were met, and if she’d been able to find a job in ELT.  I think her honest and thoughtful responses are going to be very useful for people who are thinking about doing the CELTA and those who’ve just come off the course and are worried about what to do next.


What sort of work were you doing before the CELTA?

Before the CELTA, I edited academic material for a company in Bangalore. I also worked as a drama teacher for 2 years, working with kids between the ages of 4 and 18.

What motivated you to do the course?

When I started off as a teacher, I was pretty much learning how to teach on the job. This was extremely stressful and it made me question my teaching abilities. It can be really difficult overcoming the normal obstacles of being a teacher and it becomes discouraging when you are not trained. I remember feeling like an impostor. When I switched to editing, I soon became bored with my job. I missed interacting with students and the connections I formed with them  as I helped them overcome their individual problems. I knew that I didn’t want to return to teaching theatre. Then I remembered how on my first day at school, my ESL teacher placed a book in my hand and helped me understand the words. That’s how I realized that I wanted to become an ESL teacher. Having learnt from my past mistake, I began researching qualifications to meet this goal. The CELTA was the most recommended out of all the qualifications, so I immediately applied for the course.

What did you expect from the course and did it live up to your expectations?

After getting through, my first step was to Google the things that I could expect on the course. Most accounts included stories of sleepless nights and sudden bursts of tears. Somewhat arrogantly, I didn’t think that I would be that person. After all, I had some teaching experience. I knew where to use my articles and what tenses to use. How hard could it be? The reality was completely different. To manage the course, you have to be super organized, completely committed and ready to sacrifice any semblance of a life for that month. I came in expecting a challenging and stimulating course. What I got was a course that demanded that you sink or swim based on your efforts and ability to adapt to a steep learning curve. Was that a good or a bad thing? I’m not entirely sure. The speed of the course made you use each day of the course as effectively as possible – something that wouldn’t happen in a longer course. But it also meant that most of the pedagogy was absorbed only towards the end of the course. So I was only able to really try out the techniques taught in the CELTA towards the end of the course (and in the months that followed it). If you’re a quick learner, you’ll be fine. If like me, you’re not, then don’t beat yourself up. Because while the course is going on, it might feel like you’re not succeeding. But I guarantee that after the course, once you start teaching regularly, that’s when you realize how much you actually absorbed from the course.

You’re completely immersed in the programme. It becomes a part of every aspect of your life – whether it’s your ride to the centre (I usually used that time to go over my lesson plans) or your dreams (and yes, I did literally start doing my lesson plans in my sleep). The course effectively puts you into the shoes of your learners – instead of being given a list of dos and don’ts, you’re given models to follow. That takes some getting used to, but it makes it easier for you to choose the techniques that you want to try out.

What was your experience with looking for a job after you completed the course? Did you try for any overseas jobs? What challenges did you face?

After the CELTA, the job hunt began almost immediately. Our trainers had prepped us for an uphill struggle, but it was more difficult that I thought it would be. I had expected the CELTA to instantly open doors all around the world. That’s not the case. If you apply for jobs abroad, you’re usually competing with “native” English speakers – qualified and unqualified. It’s tough not to be discouraged or bitter when you realize that the work you put into getting this qualification doesn’t stop international organizations from choosing people based on their own biased (and sometimes racist) criteria.

I have found jobs in the EU for “non-native” speakers, but they almost always apply to people who have a work permit for the region. In my experience, it’s a good idea to check out forums and blogs to find out about which countries accept “non-native” speakers who aren’t from the EU. This includes several countries in South and Central America (Mexico, Guatemala, Colombia, Peru, Chile to name a few). Some Asian countries will accept you if you have some relevant teaching experience in addition to the CELTA (one of my CELTA batch mates had taught for a few years before the course, and he got a job in China). Japan is pretty stringent, but if you have relevant experience (they usually ask for between 1 to 2 years or more), you could get a job there. Thailand is another possibility. If you’re applying abroad, it’s a good idea to get some teaching experience in India before applying. Include a teaching video/introduction video with your applications – this usually garners more positive responses.

In India, while the CELTA is rapidly becoming more recognized, it is still relatively unknown (compared to the more traditional teaching qualifications like the BEd). I remember getting interviewed for a language school in India, where the interviewer first asked me what the CELTA was, and then promptly asked me why I bothered getting it. So if you’re applying in India, be ready for experiences like this. Also, join as many relevant social media groups as possible – I got my current job by responding to a post on the CELTA India Facebook group.

Where are you currently working now and what sort of work does it involve?

I work at Kings Learning, one of the leading English language schools in Bangalore. I teach General and Business English courses, IELTS and online classes. In addition to training, I also create and edit content for enguru, a language learning app that helps users become familiar with General and/or corporate English. There are several steps involved in this – we start by choosing topics, then building relevant word lists at the appropriate level. After that, we create different sentence structures or activities that help users learn this vocabulary and become familiar with using the words in their own contexts.

The use of apps in English language learning is a relatively new development, but given the positive response that many apps have had, this could be a promising alternative to teaching after doing the CELTA. Some skills that are important in this line of work are grammatical accuracy and knowledge, the ability to grade your language and careful attention to detail.

Have you been able to use what you learnt on the CELTA?

Yes, definitely. While I could speak and write accurately before the course, the ability to explain language (that I developed during the CELTA) was particularly useful for content development and my classes. Similarly, the ability to grade language was useful – both in terms of writing content and teaching classes. Techniques such as ICQs (Instruction Checking Questions) and CCQs (Concept Checking Questions) made it easier and more efficient to check students’ comprehension. On that note, even learning that the teacher’s role in the classroom should be minimal was valuable input for me – one that I constantly try to follow in my classes. The lesson plan format we used in the course was also extremely useful – while I rarely get time to make my plans as detailed as they were during the CELTA, I use the general structure and template to create most of my plans, giving them a cohesive structure.

What sort of impact has the course had on you professionally and/or personally?

Professionally, the course has opened many doors. I had applied for ESL teaching jobs before taking the course, and the number of responses that I received (positive and otherwise) has risen drastically after adding the course to my list of qualifications. Many of my colleagues have a CELTA, and I work with a supervisor who has a CELTA and a DELTA. This course has allowed me to be on an equal footing with my colleagues, also making it easier to work with them since we have common points of reference.

Personally, the CELTA was a big boost to my confidence. I went from questioning my role as an educator to being able to conduct classes and corporate training sessions with relative ease and comfort. It helped me become more efficient, especially with students with little to no familiarity with English – which was something I had viewed as nearly impossible before the course. It helped me become more organized, giving my lessons (which had previously been improvised and, frankly, at times chaotic) some much needed structure and direction. Rather than throwing in random activities, I was clear about the types of activities and their use in the development of language. The CELTA allowed me to direct my creativity to make my activities both communicative and meaningful.

Where to next?

At the moment, I’m quite happy teaching in Bangalore, since my job exposes me to a variety of teaching contexts and challenges. I hope to eventually use my teaching certification to travel to different countries. There might be a bias for “native” English speakers – but with the CELTA and some relevant teaching experience, I do think that I’ll get more opportunities. So hopefully, in a few years, I’ll be posting pictures with my class in the Andes or Mexico City! 🙂

What advice would you give to teachers in India who’ve just completed the CELTA?

I’ll start with some useful advice I got from my CELTA trainers – start teaching as soon as possible. Regardless of salary, it’s necessary to use your skills in the real world immediately. This might be a bitter pill to swallow, especially if you’ve worked before and you’re accustomed to a fairly high salary. Chances are that when you’re done with the course, finding a well-paying job will be difficult. In my case, I spent 2 months at home, teaching English for free to a young boy. This allowed me to employ some of the CELTA methods and internalize them as part of my teaching approach.

Try to work with people who have done the CELTA – it helps if you’re working within the same framework. It also means that you don’t fall back into old teaching habits or forget the new skills and pedagogical framework you’ve acquired.

Use social media as much as possible, whether it’s to find out more about the ELT field or jobs. It helps to have a community of people who have a similar approach to teaching. On that note, keep in touch with the people who did the CELTA with you. I’ve gotten some great advice and support from my batch mates, whether it was celebrating when someone got a job or comparing approaches to working with learners.

Effective decision making | Session materials

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Here are some more materials I developed on the ITDI course – Creating ELT Materials with Katherine Bilsborough. The assignment brief was to design wrap-around materials with short authentic texts. I chose four tweets by an American facilitator and performance consultant, Thiagi on decision making. Thiagi often tweets pithy messages on a variety of management and leadership issues. The original materials had screenshots of his tweets but I wanted to get permission before I circulated them more widely. Unfortunately, I haven’t heard back so I’ve replaced the screenshots with QR codes and links.

The context of this 60 minute session is effective decision making and it explores language for giving advice and decision making. Learners will gets lots of opportunities to speak in pairs and groups and will also write an email and a tweet.

You can download the handout from this link.

Image attribution: Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash